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Camera traps completed one of the most thorough surveys of African rainforest yet

Source: theconversation.com

Tropical rainforests are the world’s richest land habitats for biodiversity, harbouring stunning numbers of plant and animal species. The Amazon and the Congo basins, together with Asian rainforests, represent only 6% of Earth’s land surface, and yet more than 50% of global biodiversity can be found under their shade.

But observing even the most conspicuous species, such as elephants and apes, is still an extraordinarily difficult task. That’s not even mentioning all the secretive species that are protected by thick vegetation or darkness.

Camera traps have led a technological revolution in wildlife research, making it possible to study species without humans needing to be present. They can be left in the depths of a forest for weeks, taking pictures of anything that moves at any time of day or night. MORE

Header image: The grey-faced sengi (Rhynchocyon udzungwensis) was discovered by camera traps in Tanzania. Credit: F Rovero/Wikipedia, CC BY-SA.

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